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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
tears into npr. wait until you hear this. p and p moments away. [ female announcer ] investing for yourself is a necessity. i find investments with e-trade's top 5 lists and use pre-defined screeners to work smarter. not harder. i depend on myself to take charge of my financial future. [ bell dinging ] the nascar nationwide series, i know pleasing fans is a top priority, 'cause without the fans, there'd be no nascar. just like if it weren't for customers, there'd be no nationwide. that's why they serve their customers' needs, not shareholder profits. because as a mutual, nationwide doesn't report to wall street, they report to their customers. and that's just one more reason why the earnhardt family has trusted nationwide for more than 30 years. nationwide is on your side. >> bill: pinheads and patriots starring the wife of juan williams hammering npr. >> but first, you need a nifty t-shirt to defy the heat. that would be the navy seals 1, bin laden 0 shirt. if you become a premium member you get the shirt free. all the money goes to charity. >> now the mail: >> bill: because h
tears into npr. wait until you hear this. p and p moments away. [ male annocer ] things seem better with travelocity's best price guarantee. our girl's an architect. our boy's a genius. we are awesome parents! biddly-boop. [ male announcer ] if you find a lower rate on a room you've booked, we won't just match it. we'll give you $50 towards your next trip. [ gnome ] it's go time. >> bill: pinheads and patriots starring the wife of juan williams hammering npr. >> but first, you need a nifty t-shirt to defy the heat. that would be the navy seals 1, bin laden 0 shirt. if you become a premium member you get the shirt free. all the money goes to charity. >> now the mail: >> bill: because he did. i thought that was obvious. ross is tough on everyone. during the primaries he did a report assigning president obama to tony rezko that report was very tough on mr. obama. >> bill: bingo. that's all she has to say and the issue dies. >> bill: wonder who referring to. >> bill: not buying it. about freewill and free market. capitalism gives the most people the most chance to prosper. the other eco
! >> thank you. >> stephen: now you are the host of npr's "on the media." and you are also the author of the new book "the influencing machine: brooke gladstone on the media." what is the influence magazine? is it this? >> yes, actually, it is. >> stephen: i am a member of the media? >> you are part of the influence magazine. except that there is no influencing machine. this it too is what i want to fight: the popular notion that the media are controlling our minds. it's really a mirror. what? no, i have control! i have control. clap for me, my monkeys. (cheers and applause) i believe the words you ear looking for "check and mate." (laughter) what do you mean? the media does not have... but that's everything that i shear that the media has control over the minds of its audience. we're all being brainwashed. >> well, the media are reflecting everything that we are as a people and as a civilization. and some of that is pretty disgusting. some of that is pretty shallow. some of that is trivial. some of it is frivolous and some of it is just plain mendacious. >mendacious. >> stephen: are
on npr. ladies are in washington this evening. were you offended by the "new york times" highlighting the word christian in its headline? mary katharine. >> yeah. look. i think it's a problem. first of all i'm a political animal but i try very hard in these instances not to immediately jump on a hobby horse and figure out where i can ride it immediately in the aftermath of a strategy like this. i think a lot of other people would do good to do that as well. the "new york times" many liberal activists, certainly desperately want an analog to extremist islam pat themselves on the back for being equal and making this equivalence. you know what? a lot of times the term use in order guy and if you read his writings it's certainly not mainstream fundamentalism. he talks about payingism as with many crazy people it goes down a rabbit hole. they have been referring to him as christian fundamentalists referring to the dug garrs in arkansas christian fundamentalists. is it having lots of children that makes a crazy threat or killing lots of children? it's insane. >> we can find alyssia no evide
into npr. wait until you hear this. p and p moments away. my doctor told me calcium is besabsorbed in small continuous amounts. only one calcium supplement does that in one daily dose. new citracal slow release... continuously releases calcium plus d for the efficient absorption my body needs. citracal. but when she got asthma, all i could do was worry ! specialists, lots of doctors, lots of advice... and my hands were full. i couldn't sort through it all. with unitedhealthcare, it's different. we have cess to great specialists, and our pediatrician gets all the information. everyone works as a team. and i only need to talk to one person about her care. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. took some crazy risks as a kid. but i was still over the edge with my cholesterol. anyone with high cholesterol may be at increased risk of heart attack. diet and exercise weren't enough for me. i stopped kidding myself. i've been eating healthier, exercising more, and now i'm also taking lipitor. if you've been kidding yourself ab
yields the balance of his time to the gentleman from npr -- gentlewoman from npr. [laughter] >> i think mr. shields is right. you need the democrats to get a deal in the senate. there are 80 republicans in the house who say they will not sign anything that has any tax in eight. the democrats -- you really have to have a combination of taxes and cuts in order to get it passed either body and you have to move to the floor and pass a filibuster in the senate. >>, cut, cap and balance -- tea party folks love the idea of a constitutional amendment at what point does reality come to these people, because we know it is not going to happen? >> i love how you objectively pose the question. this is a fair and balanced program -- >> we do our best. we don't have the resources of were rupert murdoch -- -- [laughter] >> i think if this were a less heated environment, cutting and capping is a good idea. the budget and then it is a problem. i have a problem with it. -- the balanced budget amendment is a problem. i have a problem with it. but joe biden, who is a democrat, supported one in the 1990's.
him. pretty impressive. does he have to pay the baggage fees? >> he told npr he used to be so scared of flying he couldn't get on a plane, now he can't get off a plane. >>> now, next on this monday -- a boy falls 40 feet down a well and his dad springs into action. >> it ends all well. >>> is it one of the greatest soccer matches ever? a huge comeback for team usa. >> fantastic match. >>> what a cleaning crew found onboard on a plane shocked even the tsa. we'll explain coming up. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. and celebrex is not a narcotic. when it comes to relieving your arthrit
is pretty dubious. mr. shields yield the balance of his time to the gentlewoman from npr. [laughter] >> mr. shields is right, you have to get the democrats to have a deal in the senate. there are 80 republicans in the house who say they will not sign anything with any tax increase in eight. the democrats can always filibuster a deal in the senate. you have to have a combination of taxes and cuts in order to get it passed either body, and then to get it to the floor, and you have to filibuster in the senate. >> house republicans say they have a solution -- cut, cap and balance. at what point does a reality rear its head with some of these gonna, becausei t ain't happen? >> i love the way you pose an objective question, att ributing insanity it to a republican plan that passed the house. this is a fair and balanced program. >> well, we do our best. we don't have the resources of our barack and fox news -- [laughter] >> but on a shoestring you introduce a lot of bias. cutting is a good idea, capping is a good idea. the balanced budget amendment is a problem, i have a problem with it, joe bide
of this time to the gentleman from antioch -- to the gentlewoman from npr. >> mr. shields is right. you have to have democrats to get a deal in the senate. there are 80 rublicans in the house who say they will not sign anything that has any tax increaeases. the democrats can always filibuster ideal -- filibuster a bad deal in the senate. you have to have a combination of tax increases and cuts to get it to pass either body, and you have to get it t to the floor, and in the housend you have to filibuster and the senate. >> house republicans say a bank at a solution, cut, cap and balance. at what point doeses a reality and rear its ugly head with these people, because it ain't gonna happen? >> i love the way you pe an object of a question, implying the insanity of a republican proposal that passedd the house. i want to remind viewers that this is a fair and balanced program. >> we do our best. we don't have the resources of rupert murdoch and fox news -- [laughter]r] >> but on a shoestriing you introduced a helluva lot of bias. think that if this were a less heated environment, cutting is a go
npr can function just fine on its own. that would be nearly $1 billion a year, $10 billion over a decade, if we just cut out those two programs. there many places we could cut that we're spending on programs that we do not need, wasteful programs. when the gao cn find $200 billion in cuts, that a significant. host: in your view, what is the proper role of government? guest: xiii, the government is ordained by god. punish those who do evil and reward those which is right. the government should be maintaining law and order and to be fostering a society in which exemplary behavior is rewarded and less than exemplary behavior is not. and there's a moral symmetry to the society. i think government and the country as wealthy as ours, we should be looking out for the welfare and health of the people within the ability of the government and the ability of the country to pay we cannot do everything. that is part of the problem. washington has been tried to do everything. they have been kicking the can down the road. now we've reached the place we can no longer can get down the road. we'r
. >> lehrer: we get the latest on new clashes in syria from npr's deborah amos in damascus. >> the president wants to have a national dialogue, he says on july 10th. this group says nada, we are not your partners until the violence stops on the streets. >> brown: paul solman talks to the authors of a provocative new book on how fannie mae's push- for-profits helped pump up the housing bubble. >> if you are trying to enrich yourself, increase your profits, which fannie mae was absolutely determined to do then that becomes a per version of home ownership. >> lehrer: mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it'
down the drain. thanks to npr we know about loads of unused spare change piling up as the nation stares down its debt. abc's jon karl explains. >> reporter: we took a journey to the u.s. mint in philadelphia for a lesson in how the government is losing money by making money. this is the presidential dollar coin. congress ordered the mint to make millions of them to honor every dead president but nobody seems to want them. they cost 32 cents a pop to make. the mint makes nearly 2 million of them every day. do the math. about 600,000 dollars a day to make them. because almost nobody uses these things, most go directly into storage. we found a bunch of them 100 miles down the road in a vault. here at the federal reserve in baltimore, the coins are packed into plastic bags stacked one on top of each other all the way up and down this aisle several aisles of them, millions and millions of dollars in presidential coins. federal reserve says they are piling up so quickly they are spending $650,000 to build a new vault in dallas to hold them. shipping the coins there will cost another $3 millio
at npr. skip over our speaker for a moment, over the podium as well, melissa sharp with new silk media. she is our fantastic speakers committee chair. skip over our second speaker for a moment, the key to seem to press secretary with the natural resources defense council. also the organizer of today's event. we thank you for that, bob. we are told that it is a vote and we are awaiting another guest of the speaker, congressman brad miller of north carolina. then moving on down, andrea stone, correspondent for "huffington post." glow is washington director of reporters without borders and a vital member of our press freedom member and al isley is editor at large who tells me been blogging for "huffington post" since day one. now please a large amount of applause for everyone. [applause] >> if there were a king and queen of online journalism, our headline to a guest speakers could be considered candidates for members of the royal family. when tim armstrong and arianna huffington announced aol's purchase of "huffington post" in february it marked not just yet another reshaping of aol but a
who is an npr reporter with a collection of essays again taking this subject beyond the film's limitationlimitation. it can in a visceral way to get you the story but can only tell you so much. these essays in these books tell you more fully what's going on with media today, especially digital print, what the future might look like. >> and i know i said just two more but we've got one more to look at. and this is the unquiet american. rob, it's over on the wall there if you can get that. richard holbrooke. >> well, this is a book that we're very proud to be involved with. richard holbrooke's widow came to us, a bunch of people, and said, you know, we think you guys would be perfect to put together a book that really captur
. host: npr has aw series has awho serves." a piece -- the decision to enlist offers direction. . opfc, 23 from connecticut playing with his bomb sniffing dog. he was then a few bar fight before his mother jokingly suggested he fight for his country and the next day he enlisted the marine corps. it profiles of other young man who found direction and focus. could that be a focus? guest: of course. i love that stuff. i hear from my students. you wouldn't think that as a service academy you would not have -- which is graduated one. i love this guy to death. he is in the basic of the were the demolition school for seals. he has wanted to be a seal ever since he got direction. lessas kind of thing root kid. he graduated the top 20 or 30 of his class. and it gives direction. absolutely, that can be a reason. but once again, it cannot be curdled, as i say, as milk curdles. it can be curbed by telling these -- guys and gals that they are better -- the civilians are paying for you to become the type of person you want to be. thank civilian. host: and a profile from a lance corporal from frederi
not think planned parenthood should be getting $400 million from the american government. i think npr can function ju fine on its own. that would be nearly $1 billion a year, $10 billion over a decade, if we just cut out those two programs. there many places we could cut that we're spending on programs that we do not need, wasteful programs. when the gao cn find $200 billion in cuts, that a significant. host:n your view, what is the proper role of government? guest: xiii, the government is ordained by god. punish those who do evil and reward those which is right. the government should be maintaining law and order and to be fostering a society in which exemplary behavior is rewarded and less than exemplary behavior is not. and there's a moral symmetry to the society. i think government and the country as wealthy as ours, we should be looking out for the welfare and health of the people within the ability of the government and the ability of the country to pay we cannot do everything. that is part of the problem. washington has been tried to do everything. they have been kicking the can dow
not to vote to raise the debt ceiling. but even norquist now has told npr he's in favor of raising the debt ceiling in return for spending restraint. do but regret signing that pledge? >> the pledge in question is a pledge not to raise taxes. the problem in washington is they spend too much. and that needs to be the solution. we've got to attack the overspending. >> do you see repealing tax cuts the same as raising taxes? >> the house republican budget actually proposes to rid ourselves of quite a few loopholes and lower the rate and have a net no new revenue. but republicans aren't against new revenue. we do that by getting washington off the backs of job creators across america and get this economy going again. we have a problem. the economy is going the wrong way. send spending is going up. the president has to request a huge debt increase. >> that's all happening under the bush era tax cuts. you're arguing that those tax cuts are what sparked job creation, we know we've seen the highest unemployment rate in generation under those bush era tax cuts. we know that american corporations are
of them? no one is talking about green initiatives or npr. that is the only two things we care about are those things then cut everything else. that is the solution. >> bob: we just got a piece in here. to show how it's going to ignite. >> greg: you didn't hear a word i said. >> bob: i did. it was fine until the green thing. press secretary that dana used to hold that job and the current press secretary carney talking about an issue with a reporter and not in good spirit. >> in theory, would it also be that the meetings be held in other places? i suppose they could be. but if we felt like they should be we'd be there. ask me a question that makes sense and i can answer. >> eric: oooh. >> bob: have you gotten close to saying that? >> dana: i remember the feeling -- trying to think of who is he looking at there is a seating chart. i remember the feeling of immense frustration. jay carney used to be a reporter asked questions like that. if you are at the podium every day you can get frustrated and pop off at somebody. i remember i did it one time to a "new york times" reporter and i fel
editor. chris s the president, you know, he's had interviews with npr, today he was in maryland at this university. is the president signaling that he may be getting close to agreeing to a deal that would raise this debt ceiling and that would have no tax hikes in it? >> reporter: well, he'll have to give his base something. he can't expect them to walk into this without even a symbolic tax increase. but, yes, obviously, what's happening now is the president is trying to soften the blow for his supporters being in a deep blue, very liberal state like maryland, being on a college campus be, rallying supporters in if a campaign-style event and, as you said, going on national public radio. these are all efforts on the president's part to reach out to liberals and say, look, i don't want to do a deal like this, but i have no choice so please understand me as i have to do this. martha: all right. we've got another piece of sound we want to play for everybody in relation to this. >> in order for us to solve the debt deficit problems, we've got to cut spending that we don't need, we ha
are wondering where the government can cut costs. the npr came up with one idea. >> each day the u.s. treasury mints nearly $2 million in coins. coins that mostly go directly into storage. abc's john karl checked it out. >> reporter: we took a journey to the u.s. mint in philadelphia where they seem to have more doors than "get smart." for a lesson in how the government is losing money by making money. it sounds a little bit like las vegas around here except the coins never stop coming. this is the presidential dollar coin. congress ordered the mint to make millions of them to honor every dead president. but nobody seems to want them. rutherford b. hayes. hot off the press, literally, these coins are still warm. made of manganese brass, they cost nearly 32 cents a pop to make. the mint makes nearly 2 million of them every day. do the math. about $600,000 a day to make them. and each one of these bags, 140,000 coins, $140,000, more than 2,000 pounds. because almost nobody uses these things, most go directly into storage. we found a bunch of them 100 miles down the road in a vault. here at the f
. let's try out this one, a quote from president obama on npr. he said, ronald reagan repeatedly talked about how irresponsible it would be to allow the full faith and credit of the united states to be impaired in any way. what's verdict on that one? >> we rated this one mostly true. we dug into the historical documents and we found reagan did say the u.s. should pay its debts and it should not be in document now, presidents usually support increases to the debt ceiling while congress comp plain it we know that, rated mostly true. >> finally, it one from victoria jackson, she's comedian and tea party supporter. a clause niptd obama care bill, which is now law, gives obama the right to form a private army. what do we make of that? >> this one got the pants on fire. it seemed to be a serious commentary so we took it seriously and checked it. the health care law does expand the public health service, which has a uniformed commission corps, but doctors and nurses, not members of the military no private armies in the health care bill. >> she is a comedian, maybe she was joke, we will give he
administrator for communications at nasa. mark, additional news at npr. captain mark kelly, astronauts, two-time shuttle pilot, commander, most recently commander of sts 134. spouse of a member of congress that has traveled to space. skip over the podium. melissa with news took media. she is the very effective speakers' committee chair who helped to get things going here for armor speakers' committee. lee perry man is the director of emps with associated press. he has organized two luncheons in a very short amount of time, and we are grateful for that. lowry is the nasa deputy administrator. elaine is the director in chief -- the editor in chief of "aerospace america." chris chambers, a professor at georgetown university and commentator for "russia today." mark, executive director with goi foundation. former national security assignment editor, reuter correspondent and pentagon producer at abc news. [applause] today's luncheon is not just about charles bolden, but about the future of nasa, which he leads. it is about his vision, president obama's vision, and some daunting and harsh budget r
because it singled out npr. >> when we write a law and defund one organization doing something, we defund all organizations doing the same thing. >> read all about the yes, no, present vote on the facebook page. which some suspect he might rely on too much. >> many districting, his is up with of them where you have older voters that don't look at facebook all the time. >> going forward, more and more people will find it easy to do this and put explanation on facebook. i think i'm a trend-setter in the sense. >> so far, it's a trend of one. with the safe g.o.p. district at home and what they like is the performance in congress. he is free to continue facebooking away on the house floor. steve brown, fox news. >> shannon: many of you are hitting the roads this holiday weekend but have the high gas prices changed your travel plans? we take a closer look after this break. the more we loved it. took some wild risks when i was young. but i was still taking a risk with my cholesterol. anyone with high cholesterol may be at increased risk of heart attack. diet and exercise weren't enough for me.
experience at npr which happens last year when you were fired. you have done a quick turn around on a book, fantastic book called "muzzled". a great title because you felt like you were muzzled in the situation there. right? >> yeah, you know, something -- again, we're talking about the budget debate this morning and i think you guys are right on target. when you say look, people are talking about -- i've got this plan, i've got that plan. here's my message to the voters. here's this message. say, you know, we don't need competing plans. we need a deal. we need people who are going to talk to each other and offer not only the ability to speak and shout and use bumper sticker slogans but actually listen to each other and then compromise and reach a deal in service to the american people. and what i've had in my experience after i got fired was so many people came up to me and said, you mean because you get nervous at airports when you see people in muslim garb after 9/11, you got fired? you know, i have a similar feeling and the people start to say i can't talk about certain things or some
. on the other hand, we don't want gaps in consumer protection. both cnn and npr have reported that banks which are not within fcc's jurisdiction are selling information that they collect from credit and debit purchases. that is, they are selling their consumers entire purchase histories to retailers. also privacy legislation -- if such legislation is limited to a select group of data collected. for example, if privacy legislation is limited to companies within the ftc's jurisdiction, as are many of the current proposals, the house and the senate, retailers such as amazon would be limited in collecting and selling data about a consumers shopping habit. citibank would be totally free to collect and sell that same information to amazon. do any of you have any concerns about such a scenario? >> i can address the question, and i will do it in reference to the draft bill that was discussed earlier, the data act, where the agency does have a concern if drafted. breach notification, there's a carpet for entities that we subject to the ftc's jurisdiction so we do have a concern about that gap. >> some
is the administrator for communications at nasa. mark is the managing editor for digital news at npr. captain mark kelly is an astronaut, shuttle pilot, shuttle commander, and commander of the final mission for endeavour. the only spouse of a member of congress who less traveled into space. he is not just any -- it is kebra a difference. -- gabrielle giffords. [applause] we will skip over the podium for a moment. she is the committee chair who helps to get things going for our committee. we will skip over the speaker. he is the director of the associated press broadcast. he has organized lunches in a short amount of time and we're grateful for his work. lori is the deputy minister later. alain is director in chief of aerospace america. . he is a commentator for russia today. our partners in space. mark is the executive director and a former vice president of communication. he is also a former security assignment editor at abc news. today's newsmaker luncheon is not just about administrator charlie bolton but also about the future of nasa. it is about his vision and some daunting and budgetary real
the debt and, many tea partiers and many americans think we can cut out spending on npr and arts funding and foreign aid and that will take care of the debt problem and that is less than 1% of the budget, you have to cut the programs americans don't touched and the democrats keep swearing, oh, we'll never touch medicare and social security, well then we'll have debts and, deficits as far that's eye can see. >> michelle bachmann said she doesn't think we have to raise the debt ceiling. what are your thoughts. >> i'm very interested in the, because it doesn't make any sense. we have enough revenue coming in from the taxes, month-to-month, week-to-week, to service the national debt and pay social security, and medicare and medicaid. so i don't understand why our rating would go down unless the ratings agencies are trying to suck up to the democrats, on the other hand, i have seen some economists say, yes, it will lower our debt rating and will make -- it doesn't make any sense, because it is the equivalent of, you payer mortgage month-to-month and make those piloavements and you stop buying
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)